PM faces Port Royal heat

Prime Minister Andrew Holness went to Port Royal yesterday and sought to soothe the anger of residents who have been very vocal in their opposition to being relocated as development of a cruise ship terminal continues apace in the historic town.

With construction shifting into high gear to accommodate the first cruise ship call on the new floating pier on January 20, the dissatisfaction of residents reached fever pitch as Holness toured the community.

Prime Minister Andrew Holness (centre) and Daryl Vaz (right), minister without portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, are conducted on a tour of the new cruise ship terminal in Port Royal by Project Manager Devon Sterling yesterday.

Prime Minister Andrew Holness (centre) and Daryl Vaz (right), minister without portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, are conducted on a tour of the new cruise ship terminal in Port Royal by Project Manager Devon Sterling yesterday.

The prime minister, accompanied by Daryl Vaz, minister without portfolio in the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation, was met with complaints about poor housing and rising sea levels evidenced by water that had gathered along the Port Royal main road as well as in sections of the community.

Evidence of sea-level rise affecting Port Royal is seen yesterday.

Evidence of sea-level rise affecting Port Royal is seen yesterday.

“Too much a wi live inna one house!” one woman lamented as a crowd gathered in the square, where row houses built by the Port Royal Brotherhood more than half a century ago were being rehabilitated.

Workmen repair the facade of these houses built by the Port Royal Brotherhood yesterday.

Workmen repair the facade of these houses built by the Port Royal Brotherhood yesterday.

“You know from when dem house yah want fix? Dem wait till tourist a come fi come fix up di place,” said Ann-Marie Chamberlain, who did not hide her apprehension about the planned relocation.

The mother of nine, who lives on the beach from where some 20 families are slated to be relocated, told the Jamaica Observer that she will not be moving until she can be reassured of a place to live inside the community.

“Mi live here from mi a pickney, and mi not moving, because I don’t know anywhere else. This is my home where I feel safe to raise my children,” said Chamberlain.

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